Reading and Phonics

Reading at Nancealverne

 

Intent: At Nancealverne reading is at the heart of all learning. We aim to build all pupils’ skills in literacy and reading, and improve their fluency, confidence and ability for their next stage in school and in life outside of school. At Nancealverne we aim to ensure that all pupils experience and develop a love for literacy making at the very least the expected progress in reading. Our reading offer will enable all students to develop their literacy skills and reading ability whilst preparing them well for their next stage. Pupils will develop their functional reading skills, whether that be an ability to recognise and use (receptively or expressively) symbols and sight vocabulary or be able to read phonetically and recognise whole words using them for functional and leisure tasks.

Implementation

 

Reading is taught through Literacy in EYFS and delivered as a discreet core subject from KS1-KS3. From KS2 upwards, literacy is taught cross curricular across a range of subjects which requires students to use reading and literacy skills in a functional way. It is our aim at Nancealverne that every child leaves us with accredited qualifications, therefore assessment outcomes by KS4 will determine student’s access and study towards more formal qualifications such as the ASDAN Literacy short course and the ‘Core Communication’ modules: Towards Independence in KS4. In KS5 dependent on their pathway students will either continue with ASDAN ‘Personal Progress’ modules or study EDEXEL Functional Skills- English Entry Level 1 & 2. These accreditation modules are identified where these hold value and worth to the student in the development of their reading skills.

The curriculum identifies long term planning which is driven by aspirational books and topics from EYFS to KS4 over a rolling program to ensure breadth and balance in the reading strands studied. Phonics is delivered to the end of KS2 in mixed primary sessions where we have small groups accessing Sensory phonics and letters and sounds, Read Write Inc sessions and Precision Teach- whole word sessions. Phonics and literacy has a continued cross-curricular approach across the school day. In KS3 and above phonics will weave through the curriculum where appropriate to the sessions and the individual development of the student. Allowing opportunities and interventions with RWI and Precision Teach strategies linking to specific reading books when needed.

Impact

 

All pupils make at least expected progress towards challenging Literacy and Reading targets (using the B Squared assessment system), with many exceeding expected progress. Pupils’ leave school having experienced a large range of texts, enabling them to foster a love of reading and literacy that can be taken into adulthood. They would have developed reading skills acquiring formal accreditation outcomes where appropriate that will allow them to be as independent as possible in their adult life; reading outcomes are therefore aspiration led. Data collection through our assessment systems will support teachers to ensure that students make the expected or exceed the expected progress from their starting point of this area in the curriculum

Phonics at Nancealverne
 

Intent: At Nancealverne it is our aim to help every child to read to their upmost ability to allow them to communicate in life after school. We strive to build all pupils’ skills in reading, and improve their fluency, confidence and ability for their next stage in school and their own lives. At Nancealverne we want to develop a love of literacy making at the very least the expected progress in reading. Our phonics offer will enable all students to develop functional reading skills whether that be an ability to recognise and use (receptively or expressively) symbols and/or social sight vocabulary or to read phonetically and recognise whole words and use these for functional and leisure tasks. As a school we want to offer specific and individual phonics routes to enable every child to read and communicate. Therefore we will provide a variety of adapted reading programmes to ensure that every child can make progress.

Implementation

 

Across the school from EYFS to KS4 there are 3 timetabled phonics sessions a week. The majority of our Primary classes mix by ability for these sessions, however our specialist provision classes (Willow and Maple) and EYFS students have their sessions in class to learn more letters and sounds. These sessions incorporate sensory phonics, phase 1 letters and sounds, General sound discrimination, environmental sounds, instrumental sounds, body percussion, rhythm and rhyme, alliteration, vice sounds, oral blending and segmenting and the use of Jolly phonics (*Primary resource) finger phonics, music and song books. The older KS1 students and our KS2 pupils then mix up with their peers in lower school to work in focused small groups dependent on their ability, with different specialised adults in a sensory phonics group, Read, Write Inc group and Precision teach group.

 In KS3 Phonics is also timetabled and completed in class in ability focus groups 3 times a week using sensory phonics strategies and then Read Write Inc lessons for the more able. In KS4 and KS5 we have decided that it is more beneficial to focus on the functional reading skills embedded in their accredited modules to prepare our students for their next stages out of school. However, previous RWI strategies and words from Precision teach sessions embedded earlier in the school will be revisited in teaching and used as interventions in designated reading times when needed for a student. 

 

Impact

 

The impact of the phonics offer will be demonstrated via the progress the pupils are making to ensure:

  • All phonics teaching/learning remains personalised
  • Pupil progress over time is informed via effective assessment streams
  • Pupils make at least the expected progress within the phonics pathway they follow
  • Pupils are well-prepared for their next stage; all learning remains sequential and is based upon previously learned skills, knowledge    and understanding.

 Pupils’ leave school having experienced a range of sequenced phonics lessons and reading strategies, enabling them to read and communicate to their upmost ability loaded with skills that can be taken into adulthood. They would have developed reading skills acquiring formal accreditation outcomes where appropriate that will allow them to be as independent as possible in their adult life; reading outcomes are therefore aspiration led. Data collection through our B-squared assessment systems and phonics baselines will support teachers to ensure that students make the expected or exceed the expected progress from their starting point of this area in the curriculum.

 

 Top 10 tips to help children enjoy reading

 

Reading should be fun. Here are some simple steps to help to turn your children into little bookworms.

 1. Make books a part of family life Always have books around at home. That way you and your children are ready to get reading, even if it’s only for ten minutes.

2. Join your local library Get your child a library card. They’ll be able to get their hands on hundreds of fantastic books, as well as the latest video games and DVDs. Let them choose what they want to read to help them develop their own interests.

3. Read about something they’re interested in – Help your child find the right book for them. It doesn't matter if it's fiction, poetry, comic books or non-fiction. 

4. All reading is good –Don’t rule out non-fiction, comics, graphic novels, magazines or leaflets. Reading is reading and it’s all worthwhile.

5. Get comfortable! – Snuggle up together somewhere warm and cosy, whether it’s in bed, on a beanbag or on the sofa. And make sure your child has somewhere comfy to read on their own too.

6. Ask questions To keep them interested in the story, ask your child questions as you read. Start with ‘Where did we get to last time?’, ‘Can you remember what’s happened so far?’ and 'What do you think will happen next?'. 

7. Read whenever you get the chance Have a book or magazine with you for any time your child has to wait, like at the doctor's or the dentist. 

8. Read favourites again and again Encourage your child to re-read the books and poems they love. Re-reading helps to build fluency and confidence.

9. Enjoy bedtime stories – Read with your kids at bedtime as often as you can. It’s a great way to end the day and to spend valuable time with them.

10. Make the most of rhyme and repetition – Books and poems with rhymes and repeated words or phrases are great for getting your kids to join in and remember the words.

Reading with your child- Top Tips:
 
Firstly, find a time that works for you. A time where you will not be interrupted. Bedtimes are great, but anytime during the day works too!

• Tell stories in the everyday world. Even what's happening outside of the car window on the way to school.

• Always talk about the pictures.

• Be as expressive as possible when reading aloud to your child. Use emotion, use voices, and make sounds, as it all adds to your child's imagination and enthusiasm for the story.

Some questions to ask your child when you read together:

During the story

'How do you think this story will end?'

'Why did they do that?'

'Can you find the.....?

After the story

'Why did the writer want to tell this story?'

'Which character was most like you?' or 'Which was your favourite character?'

'Did you like the book? Why?'

'How do you think the character felt at this point of the story?'